National Association of the Deaf


This lists all blog postings by the NAD and individuals who have submitted blog entries for posting by the NAD. Some of these will also be in video format (vlogs), which we expect will increase over time.

We welcome your comments! Before you send these in, please first review our Blog Policy.

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NAD President Melissa takes a moment to thank our supporters, shares an update about the next NAD Board meeting, and asks you to consider hosting an ASL reading event for deaf children. If you're reading this from your mobile, watch her video here.

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To share news, stories, and updates -- deaf people always gathered often, sometimes even traveled for hours just to meet in town. If you're reading this from your mobile, watch the video here.

For December, the NAD would like to recognize two wonderful people, Kim Anderson and Chriz Dally, for their hard work in passing LEAD-K (Language Equality and Acquisition for the Deaf Kids) Legislation, SB 323, in the state of Kansas. Both Chriz and Kim were instrumental in making sure steps were taken for the bill to go through both chambers and get signed into law.  Thanks to their efforts, the bill passed and was signed into law on June 1, 2016.  Chriz was the spokesperson for the bill while Kim was the team leader.

Kim Anderson has been a Kansan all her life, mostly in the Leavenworth area.  She has worked for Kansas Vocational Rehabilitation Services and the Johnson County Mental Health Deaf Services Team for many years. Ever since Kim joined the deaf community, her first involvement was the Kansas Community Action Plan (K-CAP) where she eventually became a chairperson in 2014.  In 2015, Kim joined and continues to serves on the Kansas Association of the Deaf (KAD) Board.  Kim is also an active member of the Board of Deaf Cultural Center (DCC) in Olathe and volunteers as the Museum’s Cultural Enrichment Program Director. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Human Development and Family Studies, and a Master’s in Adult Occupational and Continuing Education, both from Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas. Kim is an amateur artist and designer and has utilized her talents designing business logos and websites. Kim is a Certified Zentagle Teacher and is constantly exploring new artistic styles and media as she passionate about lifelong learning and creativity.  Her volunteer work and contributions to community affairs stems from her desire to remove the barriers she has faced in her own life for the next generation of deaf children. Kim lives in Lansing with her husband Tim, their two youngest children, and a menagerie of pets!

Chriz Dally moved to Kansas from the Bay Area in California in 2011.  Prior to moving to Kansas, Chriz had been involved in various community services and engagements such as serving as a Board member with the Alliance for Deaf Bilingual Children (DBC), California Relay Services Advisory Committee, California Association of the Deaf (CAD), and many others. After moving to Kansas, Chriz joined the Board of the Kansas Association of the Deaf (KAD) in 2013. In 2014, Chriz was selected to two positions representing the KAD as a commission member of the Kansas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (KCDHH). In 2015, Chriz joined the Deaf Cultural Center (DCC) Board. Chriz is currently a coordinator for the DeafHood Foundation, she coordinates many classes across several states in the Midwest area. Chriz has a Bachelor’s Degree in Recreation Administration from California State University, Northridge (CSUN) and a Master’s Degree in School Counseling and Guidance from Gallaudet University. She is a strong team-player with exceptional receptive and expressive communication skills.  Chriz also is known for her strength in integrity, cultural sensitivity, and is very involved in community affairs. Her passion is working towards the success of our future generations -- for better language for our children. In her spare time, Chriz enjoys traveling, camping, bicycling, and to be with her family and pets.

The NAD gives monthly #NADhandwaves to people in our community. This is a great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people or the work they do.  With such great people, the world continues to progress.  If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestions online!

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The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

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NAD CEO Howard A. Rosenblum shares the process of how the NAD Board chooses the site for a Biennial NAD Conference. The AHA Series is also available at www.nad.org/AHA. If you're reading this from your mobile, watch the video here.

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler announced on December 15, 2016 that he will leave the FCC on January 20, 2017. The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) expresses its gratitude to Chairman Wheeler for his steadfast support to ensuring accessibility in telecommunications, television, and the Internet.

Under Chairman Wheeler’s term over the last three years, more progress was made on various accessibility initiatives than at any other time in the history of the FCC. Immediately from the start, he set to work on goals that were important to the NAD and other disability groups including: a mandate for captioning of online video clips, which had previously been exempted from captioning requirements; an established standard for ensuring quality in captioning on television, which the deaf and hard of hearing consumer groups had advocated for ten years; and a requirement within the Net Neutrality regulations that broadband internet access service providers must ensure compliance with accessibility provisions of the Communications Act.

In several of his public meetings including his last Open Meeting on December 15th, Chairman Wheeler has used sign language to get his message across that accessibility is important to him and the FCC.

“Chairman Tom Wheeler has, in his few years at the FCC, boldly and efficiently removed barriers that have long frustrated deaf and hard of hearing people with respect to making telephone calls, watching videos, and using the Internet,” said Howard A. Rosenblum, NAD CEO. “The NAD thanks him for his dedicated efforts to make the world more accessible for everyone, and wishes him well on his future endeavors.”

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National Association of the Deaf 
The NAD is the nation’s premier civil rights organization of, by and for deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the United States of America. The NAD represents 48 million Americans who are deaf or hard of hearing.

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Do you remember these?  The NAD is celebrating #GIVINGTUESDAY by going back time, via fold and play style! Donate today at www.nad.org/donate.  If you're reading this from your mobile, watch the video here.

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What happened in Henniker, New Hampshire? #deafhistoryTHAT #ASLstories  If you're reading this from your mobile, watch the video here.

For this month’s #NADhandwave, the NAD introduces Carlos Aponte-Salcedo, a Nuyorican (a Puerto Rican from New York)!  Carlos is a Mental Health Center coordinator at the Lexington School for the Deaf. Carlos works with many Lexington students but has worked diligently to expand on services and resources for Latino families and students.  At the school, Carlos volunteers his time by being involved with the Diversity Committee, Lexington Strong (a club that promotes school pride), and the Parent Staff Association. In addition, he helped set up a phone tree to provide access in spoken Spanish, and providing ASL as well as English/Spanish versions of various flyers for parents. Through it all, Carlos works tirelessly for the community. 

Carlos graduated from a local high school in New York City, and went on to get his Bachelor from California State University at Northridge (CSUN).  While at CSUN, he started out by becoming involved within local university organizations.  During his internship at the California School for the Deaf - Fremont, he volunteered to help coordinate the children program for the "Black Families Day" event.  That event help kick-start his true passion for working with children. 

Carlos is a passionate fellow who really believes in equal access for deaf people, particularly for those in the Latino community. He also got involved briefly as the Downstate representative with the Empire State Association of the Deaf (ESAD, which is the New York state association of the deaf) and currently serves as a LEAD-K NY Core Team member. He is dedicating his efforts now to promoting linguistic access for all deaf children in early education and within the Latino community. Today, Carlos is most proud of his involvement with Council de Manos, which impacted and transformed him when he realized its tremendous impact towards empowering Latinx youth and adults. Carlos truly has one of the biggest hearts for our community.  He reflects the NAD spirit: youth, diversity, empowerment, advocacy, education, and leadership.  

He is also a recent newlywed, married to Ramon, and together they have two beautiful dogs.

The NAD gives monthly #NADhandwaves to people in our community. This is a great opportunity for the NAD to recognize exemplary people or the work they do.  With such great people, the world continues to progress.  If you know someone who deserves a #NADHandwave, submit your suggestions online!

###

The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at the national level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States. The advocacy scope of the NAD is broad, covering the breadth of a lifetime and impacting future generations in the areas of early intervention, education, employment, health care, technology, telecommunications, youth leadership, and more.

 

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What are you doing this summer? We want you to join us in Oregon for the Youth Leadership Camp! The deadline for camper applications is January 2, 2017.  The deadline for staff applications is March 31, 2017.  If you're reading this from your mobile, watch the video here.
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NAD CEO Howard A. Rosenblum shares thoughts regarding the recent elections. The election results will lead to big changes, including a different President, a different Congress, and a different Administration. For 136 years, the NAD has worked with and against many different Presidents, Administrations, and Congress. The AHA Series is also available at www.nad.org/AHA. If you're reading this from your mobile, watch the video here.
 

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National Association of the Deaf | 8630 Fenton Street, Suite 820, Silver Spring, MD 20910-3819